Image Rights

This article was written by Tanya Petersen, who interviewed Kelsey Farish for the École polytechnique fédérale de Lausanne (Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Lausanne) magazine, Dimensions (Summer 2021). Dimensions offers a series of in-depth articles, interviews, portraits and news highlights, and is available in English and in French. Republished here with

On Tuesday, 8 September 2020, I was delighted to give a webinar for the Society of Computers & Law entitled Me and my Deepfake: a closer look at image rights and our digital selves. SCL is a fantastic educational charity so, if you like what

What does a brand need to consider, before using a photograph of someone for their advertisement or marketing campaign? Getting it wrong can have serious consequences, ranging from lawsuits to public backlash. So here are my top tips! Celebrities and public figures have been featured in

As the year draws to a close, most of us will think back on the people and events that shaped 2017. Considered by many to have been one of the biggest stories of the year, it would be difficult to ignore the social (and legal) discourse surrounding the more than forty high-profile men caught in sexual misconduct scandals. Last month, Netflix removed Kevin Spacey from its hit show House of Cards after Spacey was accused of sexual misconduct. However, Spacey claims Netflix cannot legally fire him because his contract did not contain a morality clause. Similarly, Hollywood producer Harvey Weinstein’s employment agreement may have only a very “loose” morals clause that does not allow for his termination, so long as he pays contractual fines and any costs incurred by his company due to his behavior.

A morality clause is a contractual provision that gives a party (usually a company) the unilateral right to terminate the agreement, or take punitive action against the other party (the "talent," which is usually an individual whose endorsement or image is sought) in the event that such other party engages in reprehensible behavior or conduct that may negatively impact his or her public image and, by association, the public image of the contracting company (source).