Tag

eu law

Privacy Law

Transatlantic Data Transfers: US-EU Privacy Shield under review

When personal data travels between Europe and America, it must cross international borders lawfully. If certain conditions are met, companies can rely on the US-EU Privacy Shield, which functions as a sort of “tourist visa” for data.  Earlier this week (19 November) the United States Federal Trade Commission finalised settlements with four companies that the agency accused of falsely claiming to be certified under the US-EU Privacy Shield framework. This news closely follows the highly anticipated second annual joint review of the controversial data transfer mechanism.  IDmission LLC, mResource LLC, SmartStart Employment Screening Inc., and VenPath Inc. were slapped on the wrist by the FTC…

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Brexit: Questions and Concerns

Part Two I’ve attempted to set out the very basics of Brexit in a (currently) three-part guide designed for those who may not be aware of some of the history and context.  In Part One of my series, I set out the basics of what the EU is, and why the United Kingdom is set to leave. This Part Two explores some (but not all!) of the main issues and concerns that have complicated or otherwise stalled the negotiations. Part Three will explain why I think Americans should care about Brexit. There are many issues that have complicated or otherwise stalled the negotiations….

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Brexit: An Introduction for Americans

Part One I’ve attempted to set out the very basics of Brexit in a (currently) three-part guide, made for those who may not be aware of some of the history and context. In particular, this has been written with Americans in mind. Why? Because as a UK resident, I know Brexit will impact me. But as an American myself, I think Americans should know (and hopefully care) about Brexit, too.  In Part Two of my series, I set out some of the main issues and concerns that have complicated or otherwise stalled the negotiations. Part Three will explain why I think Americans…

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Photos of Oxford Student Celebrations Raise Questions About Privacy Rights and Journalism

Dear reader, This post was originally published on 14 October 2018, and subsequently deleted on 24 October 2019, after an interested party contacted me and asked that any reference to them in my blog post be removed. I chose to delete the post in its entirety to avoid any further problems. I stand by what I wrote and shared, including the watermarked images from a stock photo company for illustrative purposes, an image from Flickr, and screen captures of newspaper headlines on a related subject. I also quoted information that the individual had already manifestly made public themselves in statements to…