Tag

trade mark

intellectual property

Ricciardo’s ritual returns at Monaco Grand Prix

Australian Formula One driver Daniel Ricciardo has an interesting celebratory ritual: he drinks champagne from his sweaty racing shoe. Keen to capitalise on the popularity of the stunt, Formula One has recently trademarked the name of this quirky act, known as a “shoey.” Drinking champagne from a lady’s slipper was once a symbol of decadence in the early 1900s. According to drinks and culture website VinePair, sipping booze from shoes is said to be of Russian origin, dating back to the late 19th century. At the Bolshoi Ballet in Moscow, fans may have drunk vodka from their favourite ballerinas’ satin…

More like this
civil liberties
Can the Rockets Rebound? The NBA’s Twitter Problem in China
October 18, 2019
employment law
From stealing to kneeling, what do NFL player contracts say about “bad” behavior?
October 31, 2018
intellectual property
A Step Too Far? Fifa takes down celebratory World Cup dance video
July 17, 2018
intellectual property

Cease and Desist, Dilly Dilly!

I’ve written previously about cease and desist letters (also known as letters before action) regarding Taylor Swift and Netflix: as evidenced in these two instances, the standard legal documents can be ridiculous, cheeky, or even rather funny. But Budweiser recently took things to a whole new level when it used a medieval town crier to deliver a cease and desist handwritten scroll to Modist, a Minnesota brewery. American beer company Budweiser launched Game of Thrones-like commercials set in the middle ages, with lords and ladies in authentic(ish) costumes repeating the nonsensical phrase “Dilly Dilly!” In one commercial, banquet invitees approach the king and…

More like this
Entertainment Industry
Using AI in Film Studio Decision-Making
January 28, 2020
Uncategorized
From A to P: Amazon’s Third-Party Problem
October 23, 2019
intellectual property
“The Wife” and rights of attribution: an intellectual property perspective
October 21, 2018
intellectual property

The Monarchy, Meghan, and Trade Marks

Kensington Palace announced this week that Prince Harry and Meghan Markle are officially engaged, and are expected to marry next May. Before we dismiss the celebrations as just another celebrity extravaganza, it’s important to remember that the upcoming nuptials will benefit the economy, too. This year, the British Monarchy generated £1.77 billion to the UK economy. This includes a £50 million contribution for fictional shows like The Crown and Victoria, which offer a glimpse into the mystique of the Royal family. The figure also takes into consideration £550 million from tourism: in 2016, 2.7 million people visited Buckingham Palace alone. When William and Kate…

More like this
intellectual property
Using someone’s image in your advertising
March 4, 2020
Entertainment Industry
Using AI in Film Studio Decision-Making
January 28, 2020
Uncategorized
From A to P: Amazon’s Third-Party Problem
October 23, 2019